Williams Lynch

Bermondsey Street Signature Tune

Musicity and Low Line bring bespoke music to the street

Bermondsey Street Tunnel has been immortalised in music as part of the Musicity project in which musical compositions are created for specific locations that can be enjoyed while walking the new 'Low Line' of London. To listen it you will need a smartphone, the Musicity app and to be at the location.

Using Geotracking the app locates you and lets you play the music that has been specifically produced for that location, so as you walk the Low Line and the architecture around you changes, so does the soundtrack on the musicality app.

Chihiro Ono has been chosen to create the piece for Bermondsey Street and her repertoire ranges from Baroque (on period instruments), Classical, Contemporary, Experimental Music, Performing Art, Improvisation to Sound Art.

Musicity, launched by Nick Luscombe of BBC Radio 3’s Late Junction music show, is collaborating with Low Line, conceived by a local resident and former architect David Stephens. Stephens was Inspired by New York’s High Line, a 1.5 mile stretch of disused elevated railway transformed into walkways and gardens on the west side of Manhattan. London’s version follows the 150 years old railway arches south of the river.

The full list of artists and their Low Line locations are:

  • Lola de la Mata - Old Union Yard Arches
  • Thomas Stone - Ewer Street
  • Szjerdene - Wardens Grove
  • The Memory Band - Flat Iron Square
  • Nabihah Iqbal aka Throwing Shade - Borough Market
  • Lossy - Southwark Cathedral
  • Suitman Jungle - London Bridge Station
  • William Doyle - The Shard
  • Gestalt - Vinegar Yard
  • Chihiro Ono - Bermondsey Street Tunnel
  • Tom Szirtes - Holyrood Street
  • Erland Cooper - Underdog Gallery
  • James Alec Hardy - Druid Street Wildflower Meadow
  • Frog Morris - Blue Bermondsey
  • Cunning Folk - Biscuit Factory

The complete Low Line walk will take you from the Biscuit Factory in Bermondsey up through Maltby Street Market, crossing Bermondsey Street and past Vinegar Yard, round the Shard, beside Southwark Cathedral and through Borough Market, onto Flat Iron Square and ending just by Southwark tube station.

“Cities are these amazing possibilities to put two things together: music and architecture. The city is a playground, a backdrop for music,” says Nick Luscombe.

If you are interested in walking the walk, you can follow the map on Google

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